small super name
<

small super name.
very straight forward here. this site is for reviewing things. most likely, mostly music. as its our favorite thing. but, we love technology, video games, and tv. so who knows! simple, and free. hoping to be able to do update's every 2 weeks. or, twice a month. we're looking for people who want to write stuff.. we love talking to people. say hi!

what? and how?
so, there is a rating system. here it is. we're not going to try anything new. 0-10. its all opinion. so its hard to rate. but i see it like this. there should be no 10's.. something that gets a 10, should single handily change the world for the better. like, a cure for aids, or cancer. 7-9 is reeeally good. 9 is actually amazing. hopefully people writing here will seriously think about the rating they give. though, ratings really don't mean anything. i'm sure it will mutate as we keep working.

we own this
the writings are the property of the person who wrote them. don't repost or publish anyplace else without their permission. thanks.

 

issue super name #1

in this first issue. we're going to be a little behind. cover stuff from 2004. since you'll be reading this in 2005. but nothing will be out yet! enjoy.

this week in small:
The Remote Viewer
"Your Going To Love Our Defeatist Attitude"

Stars
"Set Yourself on Fire"

Cubismo Grafico
"Foga"

Future Heads
"Future Heads"

small name says:
this is our first time doing this. what do you think? who knows. this weeks, me and Nik are going to hold down the fort all tag team style. "whatcha gonna do?". with the start of the new year, and the start of this little "e-zine". hopefully things will only get better. based on the music of this past year. can't wait!

The Remote Viewer
"Your Going To Love Our Defeatist Attitude"
(city centre office's)

Rate: 8.0

hot damn, i love that album title. so, for some quick back story. the guys in the "remote viewer", use to be in "hood". i had thought that hood had broken up. but i've heard rumors of a new album. witch i would not complain about. interestingly enough, "hood" are sort of known for their ruff around the edges, lofi post-ness.

this is the second by the "remote viewer" album. with it all being on city centre office, you know its going to be ambient. and they do not fail there. this is quiet, quiet, music, for late night hacking. or dancing with your toaster. forget about song structure, its obviously for losers. the title track, and the first one at that, is by far the best. its unregulated piano, ground noise's and fizzles.. filtered brushed drums. all nice, but the unorganized, female singing its great! she singing the same thing as herself, just at a slightly different time. it just feels defeated. like, hey! we just so don't care. we're bored, we have no fight left. can't we all just go to sleep!! this album more or less plays in an area of ambient post music. static sounds, deep bass. dubby if you will. clicks n' pops. it feels amazing organic, for the lack of organic sounds actually used in the album. most of the songs fumble along. pretend to be songs. but just give up right as you think its going to happen. the sparks and cracks that litter the back ground, like unplugged chords. keep the mood intact. half way in. they attack with what could be called their attempt at to make a structure song. a melody, singing, and beat actually all come together. but just long enough for you to feel it. then once again disappears. the closing song "it occurred to me, and went away". it a experimental pop masterpiece. everything, all the ideas, finally focus in, and the possibilities open up. oh what could have been!! its like taking a late night stroll through a forest populated with long forgotten electrical appliance's. they play and tumble around. unconcerned that the world doesn't want them anymore. because they have themselves. its a bittersweet ending.

-trevor


Future Heads
Future Heads
(StarTime/Sire)
Rate: 8.0



The whole post punk revival scene of NYC is getting old. And it has been disheartening to see so many bands, in the UK especially, just fiddling around with the “new sound,” when no one is sure what that actually is. Even if the Future Heads do not offer a solution to the musical limbo that the British are experiencing right now, it is nice to see someone take a different look on their British punk roots. The Future Heads seem to have taken a page out of Wire’s book, by way of Gang of Four’s edgy guitar hooks and angular rhythms (“The City is Here For You to Use”). It is not especially surprising then, that Andy Gill, from Gang of Four, actually produced five of the Future Heads' self titled debut album tracks.
Like the rest of the post punk revivalists (Franz Ferdinand and Interpol, etc.), the Future Heads have not created a completely new style of music. Most of their influence lie within the bounds of Wire, Gang of Four, and, to some extent, the Jam. In fact, the Future Heads draw almost exactly from Wire’s book by disregarding the traditional verse and chorus structure of pop music. They tend to speed through their complex thoughts in a furry of livid drumming and hook filled, crisp guitar melodies within minutes. Songs like “First Day” truly enunciate the Future Head’s tendency to do this. The whole CD clocks in at about 33 minutes, which is quite impressive considering that they have a full 15 tracks on it.
The Future Heads’ greatest strength is their ability to effectively utilize their tight vocal harmonization abilities that sometimes sound almost a cappella (“Danger of the Water”). It is only when the Future Heads stray from their vocal driven melodies that their weaknesses are shown. Indeed, it is the vocals of this Sunderland quartet that hold their finished product together and place it on a pedestal above many of their NYC post punk revivalist counterparts.
For a band that has only released a single LP, it is also amazing to observe how well the group members work together and link up. The drummer and guitars stay focused on the progression of their songs, even if their progression does not seem logical at all times. “Robot” in particular displays the understanding that exists between drums and guitar: the drumming not only follows the guitars perfectly in mood and style, but it also follows the stressed syllables of the lead vocals, and the stylized call and response choruses, bringing the listener back to the importance of the sheer vocal talent involved in the creation of this record.
Aside from “Stupid and Shallow,” the Future Heads keep their sound and song construction consistent, which is definitely another positive aspect of the band. Starting off with “Le Garage,” the album initially seems chaotic, but this thought is quickly disregarded by the listener, as the whole album taps into the undeveloped energy of this chaos to make the final product even better. Along with the fantastic vocals of this album, the Future Heads also write excellent lyrics, “Carnival Kids” being their greatest lyrical achievement on the album. The Future Heads have successfully achieved emulating bands of 30 years ago, while updating the style unlike any other group playing today. Although they have not broken any musical walls, they are still a young band with a tremendous amount of potential musically, lyrically, and in terms of pure creative capacity. They should definitely be kept close watch of.

-Nik

 

Stars
"Set Yourself on Fire"
(arts & crafts)
Rate: 7.5


If the earth was besieged by aliens in the next year or so, the aliens’ strategy for defeating us earthlings would undoubtedly concern our interest in love. They would attempt to remove love from our society, thereby depriving us of the one thing that keeps us running, or so they would think (as there is no proof that love is what keeps us all running). Yet they would be quite justified in thinking this because, ever since rock and roll was first created in the 1950s, love has been the most commonly used song theme. Although there are a great many exception to this rule (bands like They Might Be Giants write about love occasionally, but it is in such a obscure way that it is really just for added effect), most groups eventually give into the bug and write a poignant ballad or tune about their significant other.
And this completely applies to Stars, even though they break the rule in a different manner by writing their love songs with extraordinary aptitude. Stars somehow manage to keep this clichéd songwriting method surprisingly fresh. This can be accredited to their songwriters, who draw beautiful images of sleepers, reunions, and death. And the songs all fit perfectly together, balancing the quicker paced songs (“Set Yourself on Fire”) with the slower and more elaborate songs (“Ageless Beauty”) almost flawlessly.
But Stars don’t end their romantic tendencies with their lyrics. Their instrumentation and pure technical talent add tremendously to the final product here. Stars is composed of several members from Broken Social Scene (both of the bands are on the Arts and Crafts record label), and this quite obviously shows. The most striking similarity between Stars and BSS is their ever evolving verse-chorus-verse songwriting style. Most of the songs on this 14 track LP start off with a simple drum line (“The Big Fight”) or a straightforward synthesizer line (“What I’m Trying to Say”), layered by either a man or woman’s voice. And then the songs go in their own direction.
The instrument that constantly takes the under-rated role in these songs, however, is the bass. The bass is an incredibly important part of all good pop songs, as it acts as the super glue between the melody and rhythm. Stars’ bass player uses his exceptional skill with the instrument to mold the synthesizers, vocals, guitars, and drums together in a additively appealing manner.
A wide range of instruments outside of the traditional guitar, bass, and drums formula is used on this record. Stars especially like subtle electronic effects and synthesizer strings and claviers. They never over use these additional instruments, however, and there is always equilibrium between the organic and the electronic instrumentation. And because of this, sometimes Stars’ synthesizer lines sound like their straight out of My Bloody Valentine’s book (“Sleep Tonight”).
Stars also have a unique style of singing. Most of the songs on this record include both male and female voices. It is good to see that bands like Stars are re-exploring the possibilities of the sing along (along with more juvenile bands like Tilly and the Wall) and the call-and-response methods of singing. The delicate vocals complement the already fragile songs superbly.
Although Stars’ second album is not a great leap forward from their last album, and their unique style can occasionally get tiresome to listen to, especially during the last third of the album, they are certainly a breath of fresh air from the current love sick indie pop world. Stars have taken to a distinctive, yet not completely original, perspective on songwriting and point us in this direction. Although Stars will probably not be incredibly successful if they are to make a similarly themed third album, they are forerunners of a new and under-rated sentimental musical technique that will hopefully spread to a wider audience and not exclusively stay in Canada for much longer.

-Nik

Cubismo Grafico
"Foga"
escalator
rate: 6.5




its a difficult task. to be some one who is close to be ing a center piece to a scene, a style. if you declare your own scene dead, then you better have something to back it up. but if you don't, your stuck with the new [last album] cubismo grafico album "foga". from my understanding the title its a joke, like the "sweet robots against the machine" album called "towa tei". chabe [ the child faced man behind cubismo grafico], does the same idea here with its title. in album name. naming his album after his "foga" project. "foga" the project, in onto itself, is just completely horrible. but, that's not what we're talking about.
foga starts of promising, with the happy dance pop track "fog132". if you can forget everything you think, and know about cubismo grafico. otherwise be ready be seriously let down. at its heart."fog132". but its catchy. from here the album slowly falls apart. almost catches itself, then truly crumbles. cuteness is dead, or so i'm told. the crew over at escalator records [cubismo's home label] have decided so, and for some odd reason, decided to make the japanese version of electro clash. witch is also dead. i though someone would have told them. this is pretty much a 4/4, appegiated synth, wah guitar dance pop record. or so it leads you to believe with the first 5 songs. vocoded, super auto tuned vocals. tr-909 snare rolls,, reverbed kick hits. trance-esk break down. though some distorted guitar thrown in for good measure. giving the illusion of rock.
the really confusing part. is the attempt at doing something new, is completely unfocused. half way into the album, they switch over to some guitar rock. thick riffs, and amped and yelled/sing vocals. both of the songs "bear blue beatle" and "downhill", try to rock you, but, both of them then change up to just some more 4/4 borefest. its very forced, and just drags them down. though they stick out to much. if you want to make a rock album, make a rock album, if you want to make a dance record. make a dance record. i have nothing against mixing it up. but if your going to mix it up. mix it up! don't make it 2 completely separate things. and then try to tack them one with some misc 4/4 junk at the end.
then, the obvious cubismo reggae dub song. ironically called "real rock", since it does not rock. one quick, very b-side feeling dance song. [how this song wasn't cut! i don't know, i assume they wanted to make the album break 40 minutes] then, finally, the acoustic guitar comes out, the 4/4 kick drum is dropped. and some actual, heartfelt songs show up. nice piece's of work. not great, but after all the. nothingness. they are quite refreshing. if this album wasn't by cubismo, and was someone's first record. i might feel completely differently, there are many catchy fun cuts on the record. if you can get by the highly processed vocals. and generic dance production. ok, that's maybe asking to much. but the "new song (*cbsmgrfc mix)" at the end of the album helps you forget what you had gone through to get there. its energetic acoustic guitar. 808 electro beat, showing up, just at the right time. i'm glad to see some one try to get out of the mold they have created for themselves. how many more sample filled, cute albums could chabe have done? no more really. but this show is not ready for prime time. with only a couple serviceable songs, and an equal amount of just plain filler. its just not needed.

-trevor


new releases

didn't get this part done..
oops!